Vaccinations are necessary to protect our pets from potentially harmful (and sometimes deadly) diseases. Vaccines work by stimulating the body’s immune system to recognize and fight microorganisms such as a viruses, bacteria, or other infectious organisms. Once vaccinated, the animal’s immune system is then primed and prepared to react to a future infection with that microorganism. In other words, the vaccine mimics a true infection so that the immune system can better protect the body in the future. Our team of care professionals will be happy to discuss the benefits of protecting your pet through vaccinations, as well as provide you with information on the required vaccinations for your pet.

Puppy and Kitten Vaccination

Most adult pets that received a full booster series of vaccines as juveniles and should be re-vaccinated every 1 to 3 years based on a lifestyle risk assessment. We offer a vaccination program that matches your lifestyle.

Puppies and kittens are usually protected from infectious disease by their mother’s milk. This protection only lasts for a short while. Puppies and kittens should be vaccinated starting at 8 weeks of age. If you have an older pet, or if you have any questions, we will be happy to answer any questions and advise you on the best vaccination protocol to follow.

Important Canine Vaccines

Did you know that different vaccines are more important based on your individual lifestyle? A member of our veterinary care team will create a vaccination plan that benefits your lifestyle. Please call our offices at 1(866)209-1001 for assistance in creating your individual vaccine care plan. We are pleased to offer the following vaccines.

  • This is considered a core vaccine, given on a 1- or 3-year basis. It is required by law. Rabies is important to consider because it almost always causes death once neurological symptoms occur. A bite from an infected animal can spread infection to humans.
  • This is considered a core vaccine, given on a yearly basis. Distemper is a highly contagious viral disease for domestic dogs and other animals such as ferrets, skunks, and raccoons. It is an incurable, often fatal disease that affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems.
  • This is considered a core vaccine, given on a yearly basis. Infectious canine hepatitis is a viral infection which causes inflammation of the liver leading to serious complications.
  • Parvo Virus. This is considered a core vaccine, given on a yearly basis. Parvo is a highly contagious virus causing infectious gastrointestinal (GI) illness in puppies and young dogs. Without treatment, it is potentially deadly. The virus is easily spread by direct contact with an infected dog, or through feces.
  • Parainfluenza (Canine Influenza). This is considered a core vaccine, given on a yearly basis. Canine influenza virus is primarily the result of two influenza strains.
  • This is considered a lifestyle vaccine, given on a yearly basis. Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that primarily affects the liver or kidneys. The bacteria that cause leptospirosis thrives in water and is highly recommended to any dog that enjoys drinking from puddles or swimming.
  • Borrelia Burgdorferi (Lyme Disease). This is considered a lifestyle vaccine, given on a yearly basis. Lyme disease is transmitted to dogs through the bite of an infected tick. Once in the blood stream, the Lyme disease organism is carried to many parts of the body and is likely to localize in joints or kidneys.
  • Bordetella (Kennel Cough). This is considered a lifestyle vaccine, given on a yearly basis. Because the infection spreads when dogs are housed together, it is often seen soon after dogs have been in kennels, hence the name kennel cough. We recommend this vaccine to any dog that frequents the dog park, groomer, or kennel.

Important Feline Vaccines

Different vaccines are more important based on your individual lifestyle. A member of our veterinary care team will create a vaccination plan that benefits your lifestyle. Please call our offices at 1(866)201-1001 for assistance in creating your individual vaccine care plan. We are pleased to offer the following vaccines.

  • This is considered a core vaccine, given on a 1- or 3-year basis. It is required by law. Rabies is important to consider because it almost always causes death once neurological symptoms occur. A bite from an infected animal can spread infection to humans.
  • Feline panleukopenia infection (FPV). This is considered a core vaccine, given on a yearly basis. When disease occurs, it is a severe and often fatal gastroenteritis (stomach and intestinal infection), with profound depression, dehydration, and collapse. It is very contagious to other cats.
  • Feline respiratory virus infection (FVR). This is considered a core vaccine, given on a yearly basis. This disease is caused by FVR virus (FHV-1) or the caliciviruses (FCV) – sometimes simultaneously. The syndrome is commonly termed feline upper respiratory infection (URI) and can cause long-term problems.
  • Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection. This is considered a lifestyle vaccine, given on a yearly basis. This virus is widespread and infection of outdoor cats or in catteries is common. Most persistently infected cats will die either from tumors or from immune system damage caused by the viral infection.
  • Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). This is considered a lifestyle vaccine, given on a yearly basis. FIP is caused by a coronavirus. Infection with coronavirus is common, but development of FIP is less common. We do not understand why some infections lead to fatal disease whereas many infections cause only minor illness. Vaccines may be advised in some high-risk situations.

Important Ferret Vaccines

  • This is considered a core vaccine, given on a 1- or 3-year basis. Rabies is important to consider because it almost always causes death once neurological symptoms occur. A bite from an infected animal can spread infection to humans.

For more information about vaccines, check out our pet health library!